Saturday, 28 March 2015

Okonimiyaki (お好み焼き), Seneca..... and gyoza

Always feels a small triumph to order a beer and Okonomiyaki on my own and have it turn up just as I like it. 

Best bit is sitting there reading, supping a cold beer in anticipation while trying to guess which one on the griddle is yours.

Sent this picture to M. with apologies for going on my own, am in big trouble, 
....of course the worst thing you can do if you're married to a girl from Osaka is to go to one of the  favoured Okonomiyaki restaurants without her.

Panorama of my favourite, local, okonomiyaki shop.

We were discussing this, Japanese have 'ya' which means roof so Okonomiyaki-ya, Sushi-ya.... but what to call it in English, It doesn't exactly feel like a restaurant, it has  a little of the feel of an English Cafe but I wouldn't call it that, so am stuck with 'Place'. Our local Okonimiyaki place.


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Something about sitting at a counter always reminds me of Harrison Ford in Blade Runner although he was in China town eating noodles ( that is modern yaki above, Okonomiyaki with noodles on top), worst part of being a vegetarian is not being able to go to Osho and order gyoza at the counter.

Harrison Ford sitting at a counter in Blade Runner

Osho, it's gyoza and kimchi fried rice, what I miss most about being a vegetarian in Japan.



"As the name indicates, Osho’s specialty is gyoza (pot sticker), but it’s more of a general purpose Chinese food chain than a restaurant that pushes ramen — which is prominent on the menu, but stir fry seems to be more their bag. The first Osho opened in Kyoto in 1967, and now there are 533 outlets nationwide, though almost none in northern Japan, which doesn’t seem that interested in Chinese food.

Osho’s sales point is its open kitchen policy. Unlike family restaurants, the work area is visible, so that the customers can see their food being made. Also there are no pre-processed meals in frozen containers or retort pouches. Though the gyoza filling and wrappers are made at a factory, the pot stickers (¥231 for six in eastern Japan, slightly less in western Japan) themselves are made in the individual restaurants. “Handmade” is the operative concept".

Gyoza and Kimchi fried rice, although why anyone would order just the one plate of Gyoza is beyond me.
M. is promising me a Japanese version but without the counter......

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Needless to say, not many quotes on 'food' from the Stoics, so this from the Epicureans.

“To eat and drink without a friend is to devour like the lion and the wolf.” 
― Epicurus

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